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The Oxford Geology Group

 

 

Although you don't have to join OGG to enjoy most of our amazing activities, we would love for you to take membership as it supports our important education and outreach work.

 

Belonging is good for you! Membership has its benefits and we would be happy to talk to you more...

 

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LEARNING LANDFORMS

[GEOMORPHOLOGY] This is an nunatak.  Nunataks are sharp peaks protruding over glacier ice, The term is derived from the Inuit word, nunataq.

This image was captured at Starr Nunatak, Antarctica and taken by Stephen Bartlett in 2004

MONTHLY MINI QUIZ

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Mini
QUIZ

February 2022

Ok, so we're well into 2020, so let's up the pace this month... 

Can you identify this Permian fossil?

 

It's not an ammonite!

 

 

PAST QUIZZES & ANSWERS >

ROCK OF THE MONTH

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Hampen Formation
The rocks that built Oxfordshire

 

The Hampen Formation can be found in the northern half of the county. Famous for Cetiosaurus fossils.

 

The Hampen Formation are interpreted as a carbonate facies deposited in a marine environment with some siliciclastic terrigenous input.

Formerly known as the Hampen Marls or the Hampen Marly Beds.

 

Image:    This is a Royal Mail (UK) stamp published in October 2013. Cetiosaurus was the first sauropod known to science.  The fossilised bones were so large that they were originally considered to be that of a whale.  Cetiosaurus translates into English as 'whale lizard'. You can read more about this dinosaur by visiting the dinosaurs page of this website.

 

The holotype fossil is on display in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

 

 

 

 

READ MORE ABOUT THIS ROCK  >

GETTING ACTIVE

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OGG's unrivalled, wide-ranging package of events and activities

OGG delivers a super programme of affordable events and activities throughout the year - open to all. We organise conferences, lectures, field trips, guided walks, training and educational workshops.  

 

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FEATURED MINERAL

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[MINERALOGY] Pyroxene.   Named in 1796 by Rene Just Haüy from the Greek words for fire (πυρ) and stranger (ξένος). Pyroxene was named because of its presence in a glassy or vitreous lava. Pyroxene was believed to be an impurity in the glass, and therefore a "stranger to fire" and not formed by the action of heat. Pyroxene was originally what might now be The name has been raised as a group name of structurally and chemically similar minerals.

Image: Pyroxene crystals up to 4 cm long. Boulder; Lewisian. 1.06 miles NNW of Lochan Fada inlet.. Specimen collected: by C.T. Clough. 
Image: © NERC

SERENDIPITY

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